Nature's Gift Logo
 
Healing Body, Mind, and Spirit with Pure Essential Oils
Blog Banner
 
 

 
  Complementary Nursing in End of Life Care by Madeleine Kerkhof-Knapp Hayes
Integrative Care in Palliative Care. In Marge's opinion the most important book published in our field for the last 5 years, perhaps 10.

Quantity:
Pinterest


We import this recently translated book ships from the author, in the Netherlands. Designated a handbook for nurses and health professionals I think it has much to offer the serious aromatherapy student, especially any one dealing with end of life issues for a loved one. I am barely scratching the surface with this brief overview. Madeleine has filled the book with research citations, but, more important, with examples of patients and treatments from her years of experience. She and her patients come alive in the pages.

This book an absolute must-have for every aromatherapy educator, every professional who deals with patients of families in end-of-life situations, and every individual hoping to help the caregivers of a senior loved one or hospice patient. The book is an inspiration!

Please note, almost every book in this latest shipment was minimally damaged in shipping. Corners were bent, or crushed due to postal mishandling. This in no way impairs "readability" but we don't like shipping something that is "less than perfect."  In this case, we have no choice.

An incomplete synopsis of its contents:

Chapter One offers a brief overview of “aromacare”—pure holistic care that may effect physical, emotional and spiritual wellbeing.

Chapter Two offers an introduction to essential oils and an overview of essential oil chemical families, as well as an overview of many methods of application, base oils and other diluents with their descriptions, and a brief introduction to some thoughts about blending. I find the author’s shared experiences fascinating.

Chapter Three—A concise but thorough overview of approximately 30 essential oils, with the expected chemical components and therapeutic properties, but also a list of “possible appications,” ie, where this oil would be appropriate, as well as general recommendations for use and guidance on purchasing and storage.

Chapter 4—Aromacare: She offers extended safety information, including drug interactions, a list of oils to be used only with “utmost caution” during pregnancy. (This is the most complete listing I have seen anywhere. I find the purchase price of the book well worth JUST this listing.) She goes on to list oils safe with infants, with small children, and adds to the “child safe” recommendations by age, as well as a list of “never to be used on children.” She also offers first aid suggestions in case of mishaps...skin irritation, ingestion, eye irritation

Chapter 5—Massage. Much research on the benefits of massage, when possible, both for the patient and for the caregivers. She lists conditions where massage is always contra-indicated, gives a list of various nourishing fixed oils to add to your massage blend, and for the non-professional reader, guidelines and photos on how to gently and safely massage your loved one or family member.

Chapter 6Aquacare. Washings, compresses, baths, footbaths, cool leg wrappings or wet socks for high fevers, sitzbaths, affusions (no, I had never heard of an affusion, either, but there are several pages, and photos), and carbonated baths using CO2. (Those sound wonderful and I need to find a source!) Please remember that in the bath section, all temperatures are given in celsius. You might want to find a farenheit/celsius converter and add notes to your copy.

Chapter 7—Smelling, Odors and Ambience. How olfaction works. The need to discover if a specific aroma has a pleasant or unpleasant scent memory for your patient. Even children as young as two years old are able to select the most relacing fragrance for them, if given the opportunity. Suggested oils for both creating a pleasant ambience and for combatting malodours. (I love her distinction between “lowland lavenders” and “highland lavenders.” No author I have read makes that distinction.

Chapter 8—Care Directed at Respiration.

Chapter 9—Care for the Skin.

Chapter 10—Care Directed at Pain

Chapter 11—Care Directed at Movement

Chapter 12—Care Ddirected at Brain Tumour related Epilepsy Research citations, care directed at the side effects of medications.

Chapter 13—Care Directed at Fever

Chapter 14—Care Directed at Heart & Circulation

Chapter 15—Care for Mouth and Digestion

Chapter 16—Care for the Urogenital area

Chapter 17—Care Directed at Emotion, Fatigue and Sleep

Chapter 18—Paliative Sedation

Chapter 19—Spirituality, Dying, Parting and Mourning

Chapter 20—Implementation

Unfortunately, no other Nature’s Gift discounts may apply.



Nature’s Gift Disclaimer: The statements made on this website have not been evaluated by the FDA (U.S. Food & Drug Administration). Our products are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. If a condition persists, please contact your physician or health care provider. The information provided by this website or this company is not a substitute for a face-to-face consultation with a health care provider, and should not be construed as individual medical advice. The testimonials on this website are from individuals and do not guarantee or imply the same results.

Everything you read on this website is copyrighted. If you would like to borrow our descriptions, please link back to the page from which they were borrowed.

© 2005–2017 Nature‚Äôs Gift, Inc. All rights reserved. Read our Privacy Policy here.